www.airpower.at
 FAQFAQ    SuchenSuchen    MitgliederlisteMitgliederliste    BenutzergruppenBenutzergruppen 
 RegistrierenRegistrieren
       ProfilProfil    Einloggen, um private Nachrichten zu lesenEinloggen, um private Nachrichten zu lesen    LoginLogin 

Dieses Thema ist gesperrt, du kannst keine Beiträge editieren oder beantworten.
Seite 6 von 8       Gehe zu Seite Zurück  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Weiter
Autor Nachricht
Frank
Gast





BeitragVerfasst am: So Mai 01, 2011 00:57:32 
Titel:
Antworten mit Zitat

Viper,
du koenntes by fox 'news' unterkommen mit deinem hass auf alles nicht-usa/israel/illuminierten!
Nach oben
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: Mo Mai 02, 2011 16:06:34 
Titel: Du wirst das
Antworten mit Zitat

nie mehr kapieren, Frankieboy....worum es da geht...
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: Di Mai 31, 2011 19:25:32 
Titel: Wie das iranische
Antworten mit Zitat

Terrorregime dem Regime Assad hilft die Syrer zu masakrieren..

Wie immer aus dem "Tschörnl"..

Zitat:


Iran's Syria Strategy: Heavy Meddle

The mullahs have plenty of motivation for assisting Assad's crackdown.

By MICHAEL SINGH

Mohsen Chizari gets around.

A top commander of the Quds Force of Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, Chizari was hit with sanctions last week by the Obama administration. Given his nationality, one might assume that he was sanctioned in relation to the Iranian regime's nuclear pursuits or its crackdown on dissidents. In fact, Chizari, the Quds Force Chief Qasem Soleimani, and the organization itself were targeted for abetting oppression somewhere else: Syria.

According to the U.S. government, the Iranians are complicit in the Assad regime's "human rights abuses and repression of the Syrian people."

If Chizari's name sounds familiar, it may be because he was arrested by U.S. troops in Baghdad in December 2006. According to media reports, Chizari was detained while inside the compound of Iraqi Shiite leader Abdel Aziz al-Hakim with another Quds Force commander. The two men were reportedly in possession of detailed reports about weapons shipments into Iraq, including of so-called explosively formed projectiles, which were responsible for the deaths of scores of U.S. soldiers. Chizari was subsequently expelled into Iran by the Iraqi government.

It should come as little surprise that Chizari has shown up in both hot spots. Wherever there's trouble, he'll be there to aid the troublemakers or stir things up himself.

The Quds Force reports directly to Iran's leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and it serves as the linchpin in Iran's regional strategy. Iran funds and arms groups like Hezbollah to threaten Israel and thwart democracy-building in Lebanon. And it equips terrorists in Iraq and Afghanistan to stymie U.S. efforts to establish peace and security in those places. In all of these cases, the Quds Force is the regime's instrument of choice.

Iran's leaders crowed when popular uprisings unseated their old foes Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali in Tunisia and Hosni Mubarak in Egypt. But the travails of Syrian dictator Bashar Assad have clearly caused concern in Tehran. Assad is a longtime ally of Iran, and under his rule Syria has served as a conduit eastward for foreign fighters to enter Iraq to fight U.S. troops, and for Iranian weaponry to flow westward to arm Hezbollah and Hamas. Damascus is essentially the bar scene from "Star Wars" for terrorists in the Middle East, providing a locale where Iranian allies such as Hamas and Islamic Jihad can coordinate unperturbed.

Were Assad to fall, a key link in Iran's strategic chain across the region would be broken. While Iran could possibly find work-arounds to supply Hezbollah, such as by sea or air, it would lose both strategic depth and an eager ally. Furthermore, if protesters in Syria were to inspire Iran's own democracy activists to redouble their efforts, the Iranian regime would find itself in serious peril. Thus it is unsurprising that it has dispatched the Quds Force to help Assad stop the Arab Spring at his doorstep.

Iran's latest involvement in Syria should be a wake-up call. Iran's direct assistance in the Syrian regime's crackdown has attracted criticism from many quarters; it's even put Tehran at odds with erstwhile allies such as Turkey. Iran's actions have also contributed to a shift in the Obama administration's approach toward Tehran. In addition to imposing sanctions on Chizari and his ilk, on April 22 President Obama said that Assad was mimicking Iran's "brutal tactics."

Ultimately, tough words and sanctions will not be enough. Chizari and his exploits in Iraq and Syria represent one facet of the threat posed by Iran. If our hopes for freedom and stability in the region are to be realized, we must defeat Iran's efforts to expand its power and influence—above all by denying it the nuclear weapons that would further its destabilizing designs.

Mr. Singh is the managing director of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. He was senior director for Middle East affairs at the National Security Council during the George W. Bush administration.


www.wsj.com
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Prometheus
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 21.09.2006
Beiträge: 3779

BeitragVerfasst am: Mi Jun 01, 2011 19:37:59 
Titel:
Antworten mit Zitat

keep it up viper!
_________________
"I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country."
Captain Nathan Hale, Continental Army

"you cannot be neutral between democrat and dictator, you can't be neutral between right and wrong."
Mary Harney
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: Mo Jun 27, 2011 20:32:12 
Titel: "the ladies will
Antworten mit Zitat

do it down there.."

war immer schon der Meinung, dass die einzige Chance für den rückständigen arabisch-muslimischen Raum die "women's lib" dort sein wird..

Die Mädels werden das schon machen..

Eine kleine "Vignette" aus Saudiarabien aus dem Economist..

Autofahren kann durchaus Sinn machen..( ansonsten geb ich ja dem Flugzeug den Vorzug.)

Zitat:


Saudi Arabia
The brrrm of dissent


Even the most conservative of monarchies is facing change

Jun 23rd 2011 | CAIRO | from the print edition


THE Saudi way of life is under threat. On every border of the kingdom, ungrateful subjects have turned against their rulers. A powerful ally and shield for 60 years, America, has forsaken friendship and applauded these uprisings, while the Shia devils of Iran plot intrigue everywhere. Trouble brews in the kingdom, too. King Abdullah is 89 or so and weak with age. Crown Prince Sultan, his anointed successor, is 87 and ailing. The next in line, Prince Nayef, the feared interior minister, is 78 and badly diabetic. The young grow restless and impertinent. Some sign petitions calling for rights and a constitution. Others exchange scurrilous messages by computer and telephone. Even women (see above) show no respect, illegally—and immodestly—driving cars down streets.

Such, at any rate, is the view of crusty Saudi conservatives. The world’s most absolute monarchy looks anomalous not only to foreign infidels but also to fellow Arabs and even to its own people. But is the kingdom really in danger of being swamped?

No, say most observers, at least not soon. It is a big country. Most Saudis are a lot better off than most Egyptians, Syrians or Yemenis. The money showered on them by the state still buys individual complacency and the complicity of big business and big religion. The kingdom’s strongest religious trend, the Sahwa (Awakening), mixes traditional religious conservatism with a reformist political streak inspired by the Muslim Brothers. It has the organisational reach to make trouble. But its figureheads remain pampered by the ruling family—and loyal to it. Without their blessing, no protest movement is likely to gain traction.

The money shows no sign of drying up. Confident of its ability to move markets, Saudi Arabia may ramp up oil production by 500,000 barrels a day (b/d), snubbing calls by other OPEC members to curb supplies and keep prices high. Investment in new oilfields and infrastructure suggest that the Saudis can sustain production at a hefty 10m b/d—worth around $1 billion at current prices—for some time to come.

Yet subtle changes are afoot. An increasingly irreverent, subversive tone infuses chat in the thriving Saudi ether via text messages, Twitter and Facebook. This reveals a growing gap between the elderly princes and an increasingly cosmopolitan populace.

On June 17th only a few score women actually got behind the wheel to protest against the unique Saudi ban on female drivers. By and large, police shied away from intervening, emboldening more women to join the movement. The Saudi way of life may be about to shift.


http://www.economist.com/node/18867430
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: Fr Jul 08, 2011 14:47:55 
Titel: F.A. Hayek
Antworten mit Zitat

In einem sehr lesenswerten Kommentar zum Thema von Fuad Ajami im "Tschörnl" kommt auch der herausragende "altösterreichische" Wirtschaftswissenschafter F.A. Hayek zu Ehren.

Hayek war und ist nach wie vor im postkommunistischen Beamten- und Pensionistenparadies Österreich nicht sehr populär..was Rückschlüsse auf die beschränkte intellektuelle Verfasstheit unserer politischen Eliten zulässt..dies nur nebenbei..

Zitat:


The Road to Serfdom and the Arab Revolt

The dictators who came to power in the 1950s and '60s were economic levelers who impoverished their countries. Today's unrest is the result.

By FOUAD AJAMI

The late great Austrian economist F.A. Hayek would have seen the Arab Spring for the economic revolt it was right from the start. For generations the Arab populations had bartered away their political freedom for economic protection. They rose in rebellion when it dawned on them that the bargain had not worked, that the system of subsidies, and the promise of equality held out by the autocrats, had proven a colossal failure.

What Hayek would call the Arab world's "road to serfdom" began when the old order of merchants and landholders was upended in the 1950s and '60s by a political and military class that assumed supreme power. The officers and ideologues who came to rule Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Libya, Algeria and Yemen were men contemptuous of the marketplace and of economic freedom. As a rule, they hailed from the underclass and had no regard for the sanctity of wealth and property. They had come to level the economic order, and they put the merchant classes, and those who were the mainstay of the free market, to flight.

It was in the 1950s that the foreign minorities who had figured prominently in the economic life of Egypt after the cotton boom of the 1860s, and who had drawn that country into the web of the world economy, would be sent packing. The Jews and the Greeks and the Italians would take with them their skills and habits. The military class, and the Fabian socialists around them, distrusted free trade and the marketplace and were determined to rule over them or without them.

The Egyptian way would help tilt the balance against the private sector in other Arab lands as well. In Iraq, the Jews of the country, on its soil for well over two millennia, were dispossessed and banished in 1950-51. They had mastered the retail trade and were the most active community in the commerce of Baghdad. Some Shiite merchants stepped into their role, but this was short-lived. Military officers and ideologues of the Baath Party from the "Sunni triangle"—men with little going for them save their lust for wealth and power—came into possession of the country and its oil wealth. They, like their counterparts in Egypt, were believers in central planning and "social equality." By the 1980s, Saddam Hussein, a Sunni thug born from crushing poverty, would come to think of the wealth of the country as his own.

In Libya, a deranged Moammar Gadhafi did Saddam one better. After his 1969 military coup, he demolished the private sector in 1973 and established what he called "Islamic Socialism." Gadhafi's so-called popular democracy basically nationalized the entire economy, rendering the Libyan people superfluous by denying them the skills and the social capital necessary for a viable life.

In his 1944 masterpiece, "The Road to Serfdom," Hayek wrote that in freedom-crushing totalitarian societies "the worst get on top." In words that described the Europe of his time but also capture the contemporary Arab condition, he wrote: "To be a useful assistant in the running of a totalitarian state, it is not enough that a man should be prepared to accept specious justification of vile deeds; he must himself be prepared actively to break every moral rule he has ever known if this seems necessary to achieve the end set for him. Since it is the supreme leader who alone determines the ends, his instruments must have no moral convictions of their own."

This well describes the decades-long brutal dictatorship of Syria's Hafez al-Assad, and now his son Bashar's rule. It is said that Hafez began his dynasty with little more than a modest officer's salary. His dominion would beget a family of enormous wealth: The Makhloufs, the in-laws of the House of Assad, came to control crucial sectors of the Syrian economy.

The Alawites, the religious sect to which the Assad clan belongs, had been poor peasants and sharecroppers, but political and military power raised them to new heights. The merchants of Damascus and Aleppo, and the landholders in Homs and Hama, were forced to submit to the new order. They could make their peace with the economy of extortion, cut Alawite officers into long-established businesses, or be swept aside.

But a decade or so ago this ruling bargain—subsidies and economic redistribution in return for popular quiescence—began to unravel. The populations in Arab lands had swelled and it had become virtually impossible to guarantee jobs for the young and poorly educated. Economic nationalism, and the war on the marketplace, had betrayed the Arabs. They had the highest unemployment levels among developing nations, the highest jobless rate among the young, and the lowest rates of economic participation among women. The Arab political order was living on borrowed time, and on fear of official terror.

Attempts at "reform" were made. But in the arc of the Arab economies, the public sector of one regime became the private sector of the next. Sons, sons-in-law and nephews of the rulers made a seamless transition into the rigged marketplace when "privatization" was forced onto stagnant enterprises. Of course, this bore no resemblance to market-driven economics in a transparent system. This was crony capitalism of the worst kind, and it was recognized as such by Arab populations. Indeed, this economic plunder was what finally severed the bond between Hosni Mubarak and an Egyptian population known for its timeless patience and stoicism.

The sad truth of Arab social and economic development is that the free-market reforms and economic liberalization that remade East Asia and Latin America bypassed the Arab world. This is the great challenge of the Arab Spring and of the forces that brought it about. The marketplace has had few, if any, Arab defenders. If the tremendous upheaval at play in Arab lands is driven by a desire to capture state power—and the economic prerogatives that come with political power—the revolution will reproduce the failures of the past.

In Yemen, a schoolteacher named Amani Ali, worn out by the poverty and anarchy of that poorest of Arab states, recently gave voice to a sentiment that has been the autocrats' prop: "We don't want change," he said. "We don't want freedom. We want food and safety." True wisdom, and an end to their road to serfdom, will only come when the Arab people make the connection between economic and political liberty.

Mr. Ajami, a senior fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution, is co-chairman of Hoover's Working Group on Islamism and the International Order.


www.wsj.com

zum Thema Hayek

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrich_Hayek

http://cafehayek.com/

http://www.hayek-institut.at/index.php?popup=0&id=13


Zuletzt bearbeitet von Viper am Mi Jul 13, 2011 06:22:04, insgesamt einmal bearbeitet
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: Di Jul 12, 2011 20:36:57 
Titel: "The Syrian Challenge"
Antworten mit Zitat

aus US Sicht, des guten Reuel Marc Gerecht..

dazu wär auch zu sagen, der Gerecht spricht fliessend Arabisch ( und zwar mehrere verschiedene "Dialekte", Arabisch ist sehr unterschiedlich vom Maghreb bis zum Irak z.B) , Farsi und noch eine paar andere Sprachen aus Nah Ost..

Kurz und gut, der Mann kennt sich meiner Meinung nach recht gut aus...deswegen zitier ich ihn auch seit Jahren sehr oft..

Sein Hauptaugenmerk gilt naturgemäss wie die US Administration das Thema sieht..respektive bringt er seine Kritik an der jeweiligen US Administration immer sehr gut rüber..

Zitat:


The Syrian Challenge

This administration never misses an opportunity to miss an opportunity.

JUL 18, 2011, VOL. 16, NO. 41 • BY REUEL MARC GERECHT
The administration’s policy toward Syria is shaping up to be the greatest missed opportunity of Barack Obama’s presidency. His failure of vision and nerve, paired with an acute Republican fatigue with the Middle East and foreign policy in general, has allowed Syria to drop off Washington’s radar screen. But if Syria were to break the right way and the regime in Damascus were to fall, the most tenacious state-sponsor of terrorism in the Arab world​—​Tehran’s strongest ally and the lifeline to the terrorism-loving Lebanese Hezbollah​—​would be taken out. Alas, an administration that came into office only a little less eager to engage Damascus than Tehran seems stuck in its stillborn Israeli-Palestinian peace process and the turmoil of the Great Arab Revolt. ...........


http://www.weeklystandard.com/articles/syrian-challenge_576473.html
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: So Jul 31, 2011 16:32:02 
Titel: Syrien...
Antworten mit Zitat

Zitat:


Syrian Forces Storm Hama, Kill 62 Across Country

Associated Press

BEIRUT—Syrian security forces killed at least 62 people Sunday in an escalation of the crackdown on protests ahead of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, activists and residents said. Most died in raids on the flashpoint city of Hama, where a barrage of shelling and gunfire left bodies scattered in the streets.

Demonstrations calling for President Bashar Assad's ouster are expected to swell in Syria during Ramadan, which starts Monday. Security forces appeared to be racing against time as they stormed and raided cities and small villages across the country in an attempt to crush a remarkably resilient uprising that began in mid-March.

Having sealed off the main roads into the opposition stronghold of Hama almost a month ago, army troops in tanks pushed into the city from four sides before daybreak Sunday in a coordinated assault. Residents shouted "God is great!" and threw firebombs, stones and sticks at the tanks. The crackle of gunfire and the thud of tank shells echoed across the city, and clouds of black smoke drifted over rooftops.

"It's a massacre. They want to break Hama before the month of Ramadan," a witness who identified himself by his first name, Ahmed, said by telephone from Hama, where at least 49 people were killed Sunday. Hospitals were overwhelmed with casualties and were seeking blood donations, he said.

British Foreign Secretary William Hague said the attacks against civilians were "all the more shocking" on the eve of Ramadan and appeared to be part of a "coordinated effort to deter Syrians" from protesting during Ramadan.


Residents report dozens killed as Syrian troops enter Hama in an attempt to quell protests. Video courtesy Reuters.

"President Bashar is mistaken if he believes that oppression and military force will end the crisis in his country. He should stop this assault on his own people now," Mr. Hague said in London.

During Ramadan, Muslims throng mosques for special night prayers after breaking their daily dawn-to-dusk fast. The gatherings could trigger intense protests throughout the predominantly Sunni country, and activists say authorities are moving to ensure that doesn't happen.

Other raids were reported in southern Syria and in the suburbs of the capital Damascus. In the neighborhood of al-Joura in the eastern city of Deir el-Zour, soldiers in tanks fired machine guns, killing at least seven people, activists said.

In the village of al-Hirak in the southern province of Daraa, residents said security forces killed four people early Sunday after opening fire on residents as people ventured into the streets to buy bread.

A resident who gave his name as Abu Mohammed said more than 40 were wounded and 170 detained in house-to-house arrests.

He said some soldiers defected to the protesters after having refused orders to shoot at civilians.

The reports couldn't be independently verified because Syria has banned most foreign media and restricted coverage.

A spokesman for a group called the Local Coordination Committees, which organizes and monitors antigovernment protests in Syria, said the group had the names of 49 civilians who died in Sunday's onslaught on Hama.

Rami Abdul-Rahman, director of the London-based Observatory for Human Rights, quoting hospital officials in Hama, confirmed that death toll and said that two more people were killed in Souran in the Hama countryside, in security forces' fire.

Both said the number of deaths in Hama is likely to be higher as many of the dead have yet to be identified and many of the wounded suffered critical wounds.

An activist and Hama resident who identified himself as Saleh Abu Yaman said some soldiers had defected and were fighting against troops loyal to the regime. He said snipers had taken up position on the rooftops of government buildings in the city.

Another resident said the city had been expecting an assault after security troops and pro-government thugs started streaming into the city overnight.

Residents set up sand and stone barricades to try and keep troops out, and set fire to tires.

More:

Syrian Protesters Look to Ramadan

An estimated 1,600 civilians have died in the crackdown on the largely peaceful protests against President Bashar Assad's regime since the uprising began. Most were killed in shootings by security forces on antigovernment rallies.

The government has sought to discredit those behind the protests by saying they are terrorists and foreign extremists, not true reform-seekers.

State-run news agency SANA said Sunday that gunmen in Hama and Deir el-Zour had erected barricades and sand barriers in the streets, and that extremists in Hama torched police stations, destroyed public and private property and fired from rooftops. It said two policemen, an officer and two soldiers were killed.

Hama, about 130 miles, or 210 kilometers, north of the capital Damascus, has become one of the hottest centers of the demonstrations, with hundreds of thousands protesting every week in its central Assi Square.

In early June, security forces shot dead 65 people there. Since then, it has fallen out of government control, with protesters holding the streets and government forces ringing the city and conducting overnight raids.

The city has a history of dissent against the Assad dynasty. In 1982, Mr. Assad's late father, Hafez Assad, ordered his brother to quell a rebellion by Syrian members of the conservative Muslim Brotherhood movement. The city was sealed off, and bombs dropped from above smashed swaths of the city and killed between 10,000 and 25,000 people, according to rights groups. The real number may never be known. Then, as now, reporters weren't allowed to reach the area.


www.wsj.com
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: Di Aug 02, 2011 21:38:09 
Titel: es wird gestorben
Antworten mit Zitat

auf Syrien's Strassen..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jX1rsHvQQ_4
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: Mi Aug 03, 2011 16:31:44 
Titel: nicht ungescheiter
Antworten mit Zitat

"Policy Kommentar" im "Tschörnl", was man von Seite der USA und hoffentlich auch Europa da unilateral machen könnte um den Syrern zu helfen...

Mit UN Resolutionen wird sich da ja nicht viel abspielen, nachdem die usual suspects, Russland und China da mit Vetos blockieren um Ihresgleichen, nämlich den Assad Mafiaclan in Syrien zu schützen...

Zitat:



Preventing Civil War in Syria

The key is peeling the minority Alawite community away from the Assad mafia.

By Elliott Abrams

Syria remains rocked by antiregime protests that have endured since March, and the country may be headed for civil war. That's because unlike in Egypt or Tunisia, sectarian rivalries are central to Syrian politics. That adds an element of danger to the situation—but also points the way toward how dictator Bashar al-Assad may fall, especially if the West takes the proper initiative.

Syria's population is 74% Sunni Muslim. Yet the Assad regime is Alawite, an offshoot of Shiite Islam—often considered heretical by orthodox Sunnis—that comprises only 10% or 15% of Syrians. The best-armed and best-trained divisions of the Syrian army are Alawite.

As President Assad has cracked down on protesters with violent force, killing roughly 2,000, Washington's reaction has been slow and unsteady. On May 19, President Obama called for a "serious dialogue" between the regime and the protesters in a speech at the State Department. Yet on July 31, he said "the courageous Syrian people who have demonstrated in the streets will determine its future." Which is it? U.S. Ambassador Robert Ford's July visit to the city of Hama—where he was received by the crowds with bouquets of flowers—is a reminder that U.S. actions remain critically important to any chance of a less violent outcome.

There appears to be no U.S. strategy except prayers that Syria doesn't turn into Libya: a full-fledged civil war. With the NATO military action in Libya now a source of contention both in the U.S. and among NATO allies, the last thing the White House likely wants is increased violence in Syria. Washington's inaction would then make it appear callous and inept—and could eventually lead to calls for a no-fly zone, arming the rebels, or even some form of military intervention.

American leadership can help avoid civil war. Our goal should be to separate the Assad family and its closest cronies from the rest of the Alawite community.

Across Alawite society there are varying degrees of loyalty to the Assads. There are close supporters who know their fate is tied to that of Assad, but there are many others who care little about the ruling family but are paralyzed by fear of vengeance against the entire community after President Assad is gone. The Alawite generals in the Syrian Army should be key targets for a campaign of psychological warfare urging them to salvage their community's post-Assad future by refusing now to kill their fellow citizens. The U.S. should address them publicly, but also reach out to them privately through whatever intelligence or military channels are available.

Here the Turkish government may be able to help, for they turned against Assad even before the U.S. did. The Turks were pursuing their own interests, seeking to displace Iran as the outside power most influential in Syria. But they also don't want to see a Syrian civil war that could, among other things, produce a massive refugee flow across their borders. Messages from Turkish officials to the Alawite military establishment can help persuade them not to sacrifice their future in a vain effort to save the Assad mafia. The message, and the tougher it is the better: "Make your choice now. Are you going to be war criminals or survivors?"

For this to work, the U.S. should stop speaking about "the regime" and speak instead about "the Assads." We should end the American equivocation and say clearly that Assad must and will go. The Alawites, and the generals in particular, won't think hard about their place in Syria's future until they are convinced Assad is finished.

For this reason, Ambassador Ford should be recalled now, to demonstrate a final break with the Assads, or he should be deployed repeatedly, as he was in Hama, to symbolize America's support for the opposition. For the same reason the U.S. should be far more active in turning Assad and his closest supporters into international pariahs, using whatever multilateral bodies are available and employing far sharper presidential rhetoric than we have yet seen. Assad and his family should be offered one last chance to get out now before the wheels start turning that will make him an international outlaw forever.

Second, we should put far more pressure on the Syrian business community—Sunni, Christian and Alawite—so that it increasingly sees the Assads as a bottomless drain on the nation, not a bulwark against chaos. This means working harder to get international cooperation on additional sanctions that would hit Syrian imports and exports, rather than targeting only the finances of a few top officials close to Assad.

Finally, the U.S. should be pressing the Syrian opposition—the traditional leadership inside the country (at least those still out of prison), and the new groups such as those that met recently in Turkey—to state with greater clarity their commitment to civil peace when the Assads are gone. They should pledge that post-Assad Syria will protect all minorities—the Alawites, Kurds and the very nervous Christian communities. They should agree now to an international role in providing these protections and guarantees. The more detailed these pledges are, and the more publicity and international support they get, the more good they will do inside Syria.

But for all the justified focus on Syria, the single event that would most help bring down the Assads would be the fall of Moammar Gadhafi in Libya. It still isn't clear today if the lesson of the Arab Spring is that dictators are doomed or that dictators willing to shoot peaceful protesters can win. Once Gadhafi goes, the oxygen Libya is sucking from the Arab struggle for democracy will circulate again. The NATO effort—however poorly implemented—will have finally been a success, and threats of possible military action to protect civilians, especially refugees, will have some credibility.

Meantime, much can be done to avoid a sectarian war in Syria if the Assad mafia can be separated from much of its own sectarian support. We can use our voice and influence to persuade Syria's minorities that they have a secure future after Assad is gone—and help all of Syria's communities agree on the rules for the post-Assad era that is coming.

Mr. Abrams, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, handled Middle East affairs at the National Security Council from 2001 to 2009.


www.wsj.com
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Zuckerbäcker
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 05.01.2009
Beiträge: 1834

BeitragVerfasst am: Fr Sep 16, 2011 14:05:46 
Titel:
Antworten mit Zitat

Vorübergehendes Endergebnis vom Libyschen Demokratiekampf in Bildern mit Untertitel:


"Allahu Akbar": Rebellenkämpfer vor Bani Walid.


Großer Empfang für Erdogan in Tripolis.

Man möchte meinen in der politischen Abteilung der NATO und den Nachrichtendiensten von FR und GB sitzen an den maßgeblichen Stellen nur mehr Nulpen: Der aufstrebende Führer der muslimischen Welt entbietet herzliche Dankesgrüße.

(Dass vorher genügend Informierte genau vor so etwas gewarnt haben war natürlich - wie immer in solchen Fällen - reine Verschwörungstheorie.)

Quelle: http://derstandard.at/1315006547340/Gaddafi-Gegner-Bani-Walid-wird-heute-befreit
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: Di Sep 20, 2011 17:20:03 
Titel: Josef Joffe
Antworten mit Zitat

sieht den "arabischen Herbst" in der "Die Zeit" differenziert pessimistisch..

http://www.zeit.de/2011/38/Israel
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: Mo Okt 17, 2011 21:43:18 
Titel: Syrien...
Antworten mit Zitat

http://tvthek.orf.at/programs/1328-Weltjournal/episodes/3020465-Weltjournal/3030285-Weltjournal
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: Fr Okt 21, 2011 23:59:49 
Titel: "Und der Westen schaut zu.."
Antworten mit Zitat

http://dastandard.at/1319180931849/Portraet-eines-Exil-Syrers-Der-Westen-schaut-zu
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
JCStennis
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.02.2009
Beiträge: 959
Wohnort: Wien

BeitragVerfasst am: So Okt 23, 2011 23:12:40 
Titel:
Antworten mit Zitat

jetzt hat die NATO ressourcen für syrien wink

komisch, je östlicher das land, desto erfolgloser sind militärische interventionen:

vietnam ein debakel

afghanistan eines für USSR und USA

irak keine erfolgsstory

libyen noch am besten

wenn man dem folgt, kann man nur sagen: blöderweise liegt syrien näher am irak als an libyen wink
_________________
Check six!

Die Friedhöfe sind voll mit Unersetzlichen.
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Porsche
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 19.03.2005
Beiträge: 712

BeitragVerfasst am: Mo Okt 24, 2011 06:52:29 
Titel:
Antworten mit Zitat

Venezuela ! ?
_________________
"Auch wenn man den Schlagstock anstelle eines Gespräch einsetzten kann werden Worte immer ihre Macht behalten. Worte lassen einen Sinn erschließen und für die die bereit sind zuzuhören formulieren sie die Wahrheit..."
V (V wie Vendetta)
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Prometheus
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 21.09.2006
Beiträge: 3779

BeitragVerfasst am: Mo Okt 24, 2011 16:02:57 
Titel:
Antworten mit Zitat

Zitat:
vietnam ein debakel


woran nicht die Militärs schuld sind...
_________________
"I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country."
Captain Nathan Hale, Continental Army

"you cannot be neutral between democrat and dictator, you can't be neutral between right and wrong."
Mary Harney
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: Mo Okt 24, 2011 20:22:46 
Titel: Wahl in Tunesien..
Antworten mit Zitat

klar da haben die Islamisten sicher einen Erfolg eingefahren..

warten wir mal aufs Endergebnis..

Allerdings, überraschend ist das auch nicht, sind die Islamisten doch am besten von allen wahlwerbenden Parteien organisiert gewesen, und wohl auch durch die Saudis finanziert..

NUR, würde ich auch auf die vielen jungen Menschen vertrauen, die die Revolution von Anfang an in Tunesien getragen haben, die haben keine Lust vom Regen in die Traufe zu kommen..

Also, man darf gespannt sein auf die Diskussionen in dem Land..

ganz interessanter Bericht zu Thema hier:

http://www.memri.org/report/en/0/0/0/0/254/0/5743.htm
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
JCStennis
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.02.2009
Beiträge: 959
Wohnort: Wien

BeitragVerfasst am: Mo Okt 24, 2011 21:59:49 
Titel:
Antworten mit Zitat

Prometheus hat folgendes geschrieben:
Zitat:
vietnam ein debakel


woran nicht die Militärs schuld sind...


wenn man "steel my soldiers heart" liest, wundert man sich auch, dass die GIs nicht gewonnen haben ...
_________________
Check six!

Die Friedhöfe sind voll mit Unersetzlichen.
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Zuckerbäcker
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 05.01.2009
Beiträge: 1834

BeitragVerfasst am: Di Okt 25, 2011 17:46:24 
Titel:
Antworten mit Zitat

Nach Gaddafis Tod: Scharia soll neues Recht in Libyen werden
Kommentar eigentlich überflüssig..

Außer vielleicht, dass in Tunesien auch die Islamisten im Vormarsch sind..
http://www.nachrichten.at/nachrichten/politik/aussenpolitik/art391,745513

Und dass in Ägypten nach Mubarak der Kopftuchzwang modern geworden ist..
http://www.igfm.de/Detailansicht.384+M549d047d1f7.0.html

Soviel zum demokratischen arabischen Frühling.

Was man sich in den politischen Abteilungen der NATO und jener Staaten gedacht haben mag, die sich zuletzt für die Al-Kaida gepowerte Opposition einsetzten, wird wohl für immer im Dunkeln bleiben.

(Btw: Einige "Verschwörungstheoretiker" haben das vorausgesagt)
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: Di Okt 25, 2011 18:32:02 
Titel: naja, Zuckerbäcker...
Antworten mit Zitat

ausnahmsweise geb ich der "Supernahostexpertin" des "Der Standard" einmal Recht...

http://derstandard.at/1319181132468/Gudrun-Harrer-Scharia-in-Libyen-Nonsens-Meldung

Weisst, Zuckerbäcker, wennst einmal ohne Kopp und Heise auskommst in Deiner Argumentation, dann red ma seriös weiter..
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Zuckerbäcker
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 05.01.2009
Beiträge: 1834

BeitragVerfasst am: Di Okt 25, 2011 19:52:04 
Titel:
Antworten mit Zitat

Zitat:
dann red ma seriös weiter..


Wo hast Dein Argument versteckt?

Aber schauen wir und das Netto-Zwischenergebnis in Libyen einmal an:

* Aus den Gefängnissen durch die Rebellen befreite Al-Kaida Häftlinge
* Waffen, insbesondere tragbare Boden-Luft Raketen "verschwunden"
* Massaker in der Zivilbevölkerung durch Rebellen
* Abdel Hakim Belhaj, gleichzeitig bei der LIFG (Al-Kaida Franchise) und "Demokratie-Aktivist"
etc.

Wos woa jetzt die Leitung dieser "Demokratisierung"?

Dass jetzt die Harrer die Scharia, die bisher überall wo sie zuletzt eingeführt und praktiziert wurde (z.B. im Irak NACH Saddam Hussein) durch Kehlkopf auf- und Kopf abschneiden aufgefallen ist schönschreibt ist jetzt schon arg skurril.

Aber jetzt was Anderes: Seit wann bist Du der pro Scharia-Verfechter? Hab ich die Verwandlung verpasst?
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: Di Okt 25, 2011 20:12:29 
Titel: nein, hast Du
Antworten mit Zitat

Nix verpasst....Bin kein Schariaverfechter...wo denkst Du hin?

Und, dass die Harrer oft genug sehr skurril rüberkommt, geb ich Dir auch Recht..

aber trotzdem hat sie im gegenständlichen Fall Recht..

So wie ein nicht geringer Teil unseres bürgerlichen Rechts hier im "Abendland" Wurzeln in den Traditionen des Christentums hat, sowie ein Teil der indischen Gesetzgebung Wurzeln in hinduistischen Traditionen hat, und nicht einmal die Kummerln in Peking Teil des chinesischen Kulturerbes ganz aus ihren Gesetzen raushalten konnten, so ist selbstverständlich auch der Islam, als kulturelles Erbe, in islamischen Gesellschaften ein Teil der Überlieferung in den Gesetzestexten..

Und damit hab ich kein Problem..

und darauf bezieht sich die Harrer..

und da hat sie Recht..( ausnahmsweise, meiner Meinung nach, wie ich betonte..)
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: Mi Nov 02, 2011 17:29:55 
Titel: wobei...
Antworten mit Zitat

am Besten formuliert es wohl Hamed Abdel-Samad..

ganz hervorragend formuliert..

er meint, sollen es die Islamisten ruhig versuchen, die bringen eh nix zusammen..und dann wäre die Zeit für die Liberalen gekommen..

Einziges Problem dabei ist natürlich, die Islamisten werden immer versuchen erstens über demokratische Wahlen an die Macht zu kommen, nur um danach die Demokratie natürlich abzuschaffen, weil sie in einer Demokratie ja nicht wieder gewählt würden...

Das ist natürlich das Gefährliche dabei..

Kann heute kein Mensch sagen, wie demokratisch die Türkei in 5 Jahren noch ist, wenn Erdogan dort noch länger an der Macht ist..

Zitat:


Hamed Abdel-Samad|02.11.2011
Scharia oder Scharia light? Eine gefährliche Wahl!

Eine Religion hat noch nie die Demokratie befördert. Deshalb ist es eine Chance für Liberale, wenn Islamisten nach den Wahlen Verantwortung übernehmen – und scheitern.

Hat die Nato den Weg für die Scharia in Libyen frei gebombt? Hat der Gemüsehändler Bouazizi sich selbst verbrannt, damit die Islamisten in seinem Heimatland Tunesien die Macht ergreifen? Sind Millionen Ägypter auf die Straße gegangen, damit am Ende die Militärs und die Muslimbrüder die Macht teilen? Ist der arabische Traum von Freiheit und Demokratie nun ausgeträumt? Man könnte alle vier Fragen mit Ja beantworten. Doch die Lage ist vielschichtiger und viel komplizierter als das.

Für Frauen könnte durch die Einführung der Scharia in Nordafrika eine Form der Unterdrückung gegen eine andere ausgetauscht werden
Was wir in Nordafrika erleben, ist die natürliche Entwicklung in postrevolutionären Zeiten. Zunächst brechen die Krankheiten der Gesellschaft aus, die unter der Diktatur Jahrzehnte versteckt waren. Die einen sehnen sich nach den Zeiten der Despotie, wo alles angeblich berechenbarer war, die anderen klammern sich ungeduldig an die erste Alternative, die sich herauskristallisiert. Und da in den drei Ländern nicht viele Optionen zur Wahl stehen, schwanken die Menschen nun zwischen Scharia und Scharia light.

Die einen wollen die islamische Gesetzgebung in die demokratischen Strukturen integrieren, die anderen wollen, dass die Scharia von Anfang an das Maß aller Dinge wird. In beiden Fällen ist die Scharia ein trojanisches Pferd, das den gesamten Erneuerungsprozess zum Erliegen bringen und diese Länder Jahrhunderte zurückwerfen könnte.

Der Islam und die Demokratie

Ist der Islam mit Demokratie überhaupt vereinbar? Ein klares Nein. Im Zuge der Euphorie über den Ausbruch der arabischen Revolution interpretierten viele die Befreiungsbewegung voreilig als ein Zeichen dafür, dass sich Islam und Demokratie nicht ausschließen. Doch diese Beobachter wissen scheinbar wenig über das Wesen des Islam und das Wesen dieser Revolution.

Sie fand nicht wegen, sondern trotz des Islam statt. Vor und während des Aufstandes riefen religiöse Gelehrte in Ägypten, Bahrain, Libyen, Syrien und Marokko die eigene Bevölkerung auf, sich an den Demonstrationen nicht zu beteiligen, weil diese unislamisch seien und zu einer Spaltung des Landes führen könnten. Auch oppositionelle Islamisten wie die Muslimbrüder blieben zunächst auf Distanz – bis klar wurde, dass die Tage des Diktators gezählt waren.

Erst dann zeigten sie sich und versuchten, die Bewegung für sich zu vereinnahmen. Um die Sympathie der jungen Menschen zu gewinnen, reden sie sogar neuerdings von Demokratie. Demokratie aber wurde nie aus dem Mutterleib einer Religion geboren, sondern musste sich fast immer auch gegen die religiösen Autoritäten durchsetzen. Der Vatikan hat sich nicht demokratisiert und hat die Demokratiebewegung nicht angeführt, sondern er wurde durch die Aufklärung entmachtet.

In den meisten islamisch geprägten Gesellschaften gibt es diese Skepsis gegenüber der Religion noch nicht. Viele Araber sagen, die Religion sei ein Teil der Lösung in diesen Gesellschaften. Ich sage, die Religion ist ein Teil des Problems.

Der Islam ist aus einem einfachen Grund nicht demokratiefähig, weil er davon ausgeht, dass Gott der Gesetzgeber ist und seine Gesetze nicht verhandelbar sind. Hier kommt es zu einer Gleichsetzung von Gesetz und Moral. Die Demokratie dagegen sieht den Menschen als Gesetzgeber und räumt ihm alle Freiheiten ein, solange andere davon keinen Schaden erleiden.

Kein Konsens über die Gewährleistung individueller Freiheiten

Der Islam muss aber auch nicht demokratiekompatibel gemacht werden, um eine Demokratie in einem islamischen Land möglich zu machen. Es reicht, wenn man den historischen Kontext des Korans versteht und die Texte dadurch relativiert. So weit sind viele in der arabischen Welt aber noch nicht. Und diejenigen, die zu dieser Erkenntnis gelangt sind, scheuen den Kampf.

Die meisten wollen zwar Rechtsstaatlichkeit, Gewaltenteilung und freie Wahlen. Doch über die Gewährleistung der individuellen Freiheit scheiden sich die Geister. Mit dem ägyptischen Präsidentschaftskandidaten und früheren Anführer der Muslimbruderschaft, Abd al-Munem Abu Futuh, sprach ich vor einigen Monaten in Kairo.

Er lehnte die Idee eines Gottesstaats ab mit der Begründung, dass kein Mensch im Namen Gottes sprechen darf. Er will nicht das iranische, sondern das türkische Modell: eine Demokratie, die die islamische Tradition und die ägyptische Partikularität berücksichtige, wie er sagt. Deshalb würde er als Präsident keine „zügellose Freiheiten“ zulassen, die gegen den Islam verstoßen. Keine Demokratie sei überlebensfähig, wenn sie die kulturellen Besonderheiten des Landes außer Acht ließe, meint Abu Futuh.

Ähnlich argumentiert der Chef der tunesischen Partei der islamischen Renaissance, Ennahda, Rachid al-Ghannouchi. Anders denken die streng religiösen Salafisten, die mit kräftigen Spenden aus Saudi-Arabien versuchen, die arabische Welt in Scharia-Staaten zu verwandeln.



Übergangsrat will Gesetze auf Basis der Scharia
Auch der siegreiche Chef des Übergangsrats in Libyen, Mustafa Abd al-Dschalil, will nicht abwarten, bis ein gewähltes Parlament die Verfassung des Landes niederschreibt, und legt sich fest, dass der Koran künftig die Verfassung des Landes sein wird.

Nur Scharia könne nun für Recht und Ordnung sorgen

Libyen hat scheinbar keine andere Wahl, als sich auf die Scharia zu berufen, denn dort gab es bis zum Sturz Gaddafis weder eine Verfassung noch politische Institutionen, die die Konturen des neuen Staates bilden könnten. Und so bleibt es den neuen Machthabern nun, entweder die Verfassung eines europäischen Landes zu kopieren oder sich auf eine Gesetzgebung zu berufen, die bei der Mehrheit Akzeptanz findet. Die Scharia könne nun für Recht und Ordnung sorgen, glaubt Abd al-Dschalil.

Er begreift nicht, dass er dadurch eine Form der Unterdrückung gegen eine andere austauscht. Ein Problem ist auch, dass in Libyen eine Generation ans Ruder kommt, die nichts als Kämpfen gelernt hat: junge Islamisten, die noch nie einen Job hatten, dafür ein Maschinengewehr. Menschen, die in ihrem Leben nichts anderes gelernt haben, als zu töten, können sehr schwer in einen politischen Prozess integriert werden. Sie üben nun Druck auf den Übergangsrat aus, scheinbar mit Erfolg.

Und die Nato? Was kann die Nato überhaupt noch in Libyen anrichten? Man ließ sich auf eine Allianz mit dem Übergangsrat ein, ohne die Spielregeln für die Zeit nach Gaddafi mitzubestimmen. Libyen hat viel Erdöl und ist nicht auf Kooperation mit dem Westen angewiesen. Wenn die Europäer mürrisch werden, können die Libyer problemlos mit Chinesen und Russen ihre Geschäfte machen.

Anders ist die Situation in Tunesien und Ägypten. Da beide Staaten auf Tourismus und ausländische Investition angewiesen sind, können sie sich keine Isolation leisten. Deshalb geben sich die Islamisten in Kairo und Tunis moderat und betonen, dass sie nicht die Einführung der Scharia-Gesetze, sondern nur der Scharia-Prinzipien anstreben, also: Gerechtigkeit, Solidarität und Bewahrung der Schöpfung.

Demokratiespiel ist eine Falle für die Islamisten

Dies tun sie aus purem Pragmatismus, denn sie wissen, dass die Erwartungen der jungen Tunesier und Ägypter enorm sind. Sie wollen Arbeitsplätze und Wohlstand und keine leeren Versprechen. Und so befinden sich die Islamisten in einem Dilemma: Lösen sie sich von ihren kämpferischen Parolen und stürzen sie sich in die Tagespolitik, so müssen sie Kompromisse schließen und werden bald für die Massen entmystifiziert.

Beharren sie auf der islamischen Gesetzgebung, sprich Alkohol- und Zinsverbot, so werden sie die Touristen und Investoren verschrecken und Millionen von Arbeitsplätzen vernichten. Deshalb ist das Demokratiespiel eine Falle, in die die Islamisten tappen könnten.

Aus diesem Grund finde ich es besser, wenn die Islamisten jetzt bei den Wahlen gewinnen und politische und wirtschaftliche Verantwortung übernehmen, damit die Massen endlich begreifen, dass Politik im Namen Gottes keine Flüsse von Milch und Honig hervorbringen kann. Viel schlimmer wäre, wenn die Liberalen gewinnen und an den großen Herausforderungen scheitern. Auf den Trümmern eines gescheiterten Experiments könnten die Islamisten ihre Projekte am besten aufbauen.

Der Autor ist ein deutsch-ägyptischer Politikwissenschaftler und Historiker. Von ihm erschien jetzt „Krieg oder Frieden: Die arabische Revolution und die Zukunft des Westens“, Droemer-Verlag.



http://www.welt.de/debatte/kommentare/article13693824/Scharia-oder-Scharia-light-Eine-gefaehrliche-Wahl.html
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Viper
ist immer hier
ist immer hier


Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
Beiträge: 8981

BeitragVerfasst am: Fr Nov 04, 2011 17:21:50 
Titel: Bret Stephens
Antworten mit Zitat

sieht die Sache auch eher pessimistisch was den derzeitigen "Erfolg" der Islamisten betrifft, in seinem Kommentar im "Tschörnl"..

Klar, was manchmal aber auch übersehen wird, ist die Tatsache, dass die Islamisten die Einzigen waren, die sich doch immer organisieren konnten in den jetzt gestürzten Regimes..in unserem Sinne westlich-liberale Oppositionelle waren entweder die ganze Zeit über im Häfn, oder in der Diaspora verstreut

die Sache ist noch nicht gegessen, und man wird sehen in welche Richtung sich die Länder a la longue entwickeln..es wird nicht gleich ablaufen in den Ländern, alle werden verschiedene Wege gehen

es wäre jtzt allerdings höchste Zeit, dass Europa aktive Hilfe bietet..

Nur Europa ist derzeit wieder einmal mit sich selbst beschäftigt..





Zitat:


Why Islamists Are Winning

When secular politics fail, Islamism is the last big idea standing.

By BRET STEPHENS


"This is not an Islamic Revolution."

So opined Olivier Roy, arguably Europe's foremost authority on political Islam, in an essay published days after Hosni Mubarak was forced from power in February. "Look at those involved in the uprisings, and it is clear that we are dealing with a post-Islamist generation," he wrote. "This is not to say that the demonstrators are secular; but they are operating in a secular political space, and they do not see in Islam an ideology capable of creating a better world."

Mr. Roy wasn't alone in the sangfroid department. "I am not in the least bit worried about the Muslim Brotherhoods in Jordan or Egypt hijacking the future," confided New York Times columnist Tom Friedman, with the caveat that their secular opponents would need some time to organize. Added his colleague Nicholas Kristof in a dispatch from Cairo: "I agree that the Muslim Brotherhood would not be a good ruler of Egypt, but that point of view also seems to be shared by most Egyptians."

What reassurance. Nine months on, the Islamist Nahda party has swept to victory in Tunisia, the one Arab state in which secularist values were said to be irreversibly fixed. Libya's new interim leader, Mustafa Abdel-Jalil, came to office promising "the Islamic religion as the core of our new government"; as a first order of business, he promises to revoke the Gadhafi regime's ban on polygamy since "the law is contrary to Shariah and must be stopped." Later this month, Islamist candidates—some of them Muslim Brothers, others even more religiously extreme—will likely sweep Egypt's parliamentary elections.

It doesn't stop there. Hezbollah has effectively ruled Lebanon since it forced the collapse of a pro-Western government in January. Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Turkey's Islamist prime minister, cruised to a third term in parliamentary elections in June. Hamas, winner in the last vote held by the Palestinian Authority in 2006, would almost certainly win again if Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas dared put his government to an electoral test.

When secular politics fail, Islamism is the last big idea standing.

Why have Islamists been the main beneficiaries of Muslim democracy? None of the usual explanations really suffices. Islamists are said to be the unintended beneficiaries of the repression they endured under autocratic secular regimes. True up to a point. But why then have their secular opponents in places like Egypt been steadily losing ground since the Mubarak regime fell by the wayside? Alternatively, we are told that secular values never had the chance to sink deep roots in Muslim-majority countries. Also true up to a point. But how then Tunisia or Turkey—to say nothing of the Palestinians, who until the early 1990s were often described as the most secularized Arab society?

Closer to the mark is Mideast scholar Bernard Lewis, who noted in an April interview with the Journal that "freedom" is fairly novel as a political concept in the Arab world. "In the Muslim tradition," Mr. Lewis noted, "justice is the standard" of good government—and the very thing the ancien regimes in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya so flagrantly traduced. Little wonder, then, that Mr. Erdogan's AK party stands for "Justice and Development," the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood's new party is "Freedom and Justice" and, further afield, the leading Islamist party in Indonesia calls itself "Prosperous Justice."

Still, the Islamists' claim to "justice" goes only so far to account for their electoral successes. There is also the comprehensive failure of the Muslim world's secular movements to provide a better form of politics.

The national-socialist brew imported from Europe in the 1940s by Michel Aflaq became the Baathist tyrannies of present-day Syria and Saddam Hussein's Iraq. Pan-Arabism's appeal faded well before the death of its principal champion, Gamal Abdel Nasser.

Socialism failed Algeria; Gadhafi's "Third Universal Theory" failed Libya. French-style laïcité descended into kleptocracy in Tunisia and quasi-military control in Turkey. Periodic attempts at market liberalization yielded dividends in places like Bahrain and Dubai but were never joined by political liberalization and were often shot through with cronyism.

That sour history leaves Islamism as the last big idea standing—and standing at a moment when tens of millions of young Muslims find themselves undereducated, semi- or unemployed, and uniquely receptive to a world view with deep historic roots and heroic ambitions.

What does its future hold?

Optimists say it need not be a reprise of Iran; that it could look more like Turkey; that the term "moderate Islamist" isn't an oxymoron, at least in a relative sense. Then again, Turkey's domestic and foreign policies inspire little confidence that moderate Islamism will be anything other than moderately repressive and moderately radical. As for Iran, signs of its own long-awaited turn toward moderation are as fleeting as the Yeti's footsteps in drifting snow.

The good news is that after 31 years most Iranians have grown sick of Islam always being the answer, and the collapse of the regime awaits only the next ripe opportunity. The bad news is that a similar time-frame may be in store for the rest of the Muslim world, until it too becomes disenchanted with Islamist promises. Get ready for a long winter.


www.wsj.com
Nach oben
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen Private Nachricht senden
Beiträge der letzten Zeit anzeigen:    Seite 6 von 8       Gehe zu Seite Zurück  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Weiter
Dieses Thema ist gesperrt, du kannst keine Beiträge editieren oder beantworten.
Gehe zu:  
Du kannst keine Beiträge in dieses Forum schreiben.
Du kannst auf Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht antworten.
Du kannst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht bearbeiten.
Du kannst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht löschen.
Du kannst an Umfragen in diesem Forum nicht mitmachen.



Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group